Coronavirus and your car insurance: a practical guide

The COVID-19 pandemic has affected every part of daily life, from housing to lost paychecks. While auto insurance is no exception, the good news is that every major supplier is committed to helping needy Americans like never before. To separate fact from fiction, we have spoken with experts and analysts across the country to determine exactly how the coronavirus crisis is affecting your auto insurance.

Will my insurer reimburse me?

As of March 22, Arity reports that the number of cars on the road has dropped dramatically (about 20%) after the declaration of a US national emergency. The United States Two of the largest auto insurance companies recently announced that they would respond to the slightest risk of auto claims by offering discounts to high-end customers.
American Family announced its Premium Relief Payment, which "provides a one-time payment of $50.00 for each private vehicle we insure". Payments are released in the form of checks once approved by government regulators.
With Allstate Shelter on-site reimbursement, with a few exceptions, personal auto insurance policyholders receive an average reimbursement of "15 percent based on their monthly premium in April and May". Payments are automatically credited to your account or deposited directly into the account normally used to pay bonuses.
If your insurer has not yet responded with reasonable measures, you can search for information on its website. regularly to receive updates or communicate directly.

Do I need to change my vehicle coverage due to COVID-19?

If your car insurance bill is currently weighing on your budget, Ariana Gibson, driver information manager at Clearcover, explained to us: “We recommend that customers who wish to save on premiums contact their insurer. talk about increasing your deductible or lowering your limits. "
You can certainly contact your insurance company to find out if your reduced mileage could mean a reduced rate. However, please note the following: Do not cancel the insurance coverage you will need in the future. "Perhaps the most important thing that people know is that they should keep their insurance unless they plan to give up their car," said Virginia Hamill, insurance analyst at Fit Small Business.
By Canceling your auto insurance, even if it only applies for a limited period, can have many negative effects:

  • You are not insured against losses
  • Most states require auto insurance before you can drive
  • A coverage gap can mean higher premiums if you restart your coverage
  • Cancellation or unexpected charges may apply

Will future car insurance premiums be affected by COVID-19?

Most drivers are aware that an increase in claims can increase car insurance rates, but the overall economy is also closely linked to the activities of an insurance company.
But if the investment world collapses and the state coffers pay less than 1%, the only alternative is to increase insurance premiums," predicts Espenschied.

Will COVID-19 Affect Auto Insurance Claims?

With nationwide social distancing measures, insurers guarantee the safety of their employees and customers by maintaining the digital claims process. Depending on the level of technology in your insurance company, this may be a big change from a generally practical process, or you may not see any change. According to Gibson, some insurers already have full-service applications where their customers can find everything they need, "including filing a claim by submitting photos of the damage."